The Development Abstraction Layer

A young man comes to town. He is reasonably good looking, has a little money in his pocket. He finds it easy to talk to women.

He doesn’t speak much about his past, but it is clear that he spent a lot of time in a soulless big company.

He is naturally friendly and outgoing, and quietly confident without being arrogant. So he finds it easy to pick up small gigs from the job board at the local Programmer’s Cafe. But he rapidly loses interest in insurance database projects, vanity web pages for housewives, and financial calculation engines.

After a year, he calculates that he has saved up enough money to pay his modest expenses for a year. So, after consulting with his faithful Alsatian, he sets up a computer in a sunfilled room in his rented apartment above the grocery store and installs a carefully-chosen selection of tools.

The Iceberg Secret, Revealed

“I don’t know what’s wrong with my development team,” the CEO thinks to himself. “Things were going so well when we started this project. For the first couple of weeks, the team cranked like crazy and got a great prototype working. But since then, things seem to have slowed to a crawl. They’re just not working hard any more.” He chooses a Callaway Titanium Driver and sends the caddy to fetch an ice-cold lemonade. “Maybe if I fire a couple of laggards that’ll light a fire under them!”

Meanwhile, of course, the development team has no idea that anything’s wrong. In fact, nothing is wrong. They’re right on schedule.