Kurumsal Mimari Durum Çalışması Örneği

case_studyKurumsal Mimari çalışmalarında, kurumlar genelde ne yapacaklarını bilseler de, nasıl yapacakları konusunda soru işaretlerine sahiptir. Bunun nedeni ise, konuyla ilgili kesin kurallar bulunmaması ve gidişatın kurum gerçeklerine ve dinamiklerine göre belirlenmesi gerekliliğidir.

TOGAF tarafından Ekim 2016’da yayınlanan ve Hollanda Vergi & Gümrük İdaresi tarafından yürütülen kurumsal mimari çalışmasının anlatıldığı dokümanda; faaliyetlerin nasıl bir yaklaşımla ele alındığı, iş – uygulama – teknoloji katmanları arasındaki ilişkilerin nasıl kurulduğu ve hangi çıktıların elde edildiğiyle ilgili faydalı bilgilere ulaşabilirsiniz.

Overview and Insight, a Case Study by the Netherlands Tax & Customs Administration

Enterprise Architecture: Don’t Be a Fool with a Tool

Last month I referred to the cult comedy Office Space when I posed the question, Is Enterprise Architecture Completely Broken? After speaking with two authorities on The Open Group Architecture Framework (TOGAF), perhaps I had the wrong film. A better choice: Monty Python and the Holy Grail. Apparently, Enterprise Architecture is not dead yet.

In fact, TOGAF is perhaps the most popular Enterprise Architecture (EA) framework today, and its popularity is only increasing, in spite of the fact that many organizations misapply TOGAF. Yet, even for those organizations that successfully leverage TOGAF and thus achieve positive business outcomes, business agility is still largely out of reach. Thus, while Agile Enterprise Architecture may have crossed the chasm, TOGAF has yet to make the leap.

A Comparison of the Top Four Enterprise-Architecture Methodologies

Twenty years ago, a new field was born that soon came to be known as enterprise architecture. The field initially began to address two problems:

  • System complexity—Organizations were spending more and more money building IT systems; and
  • Poor business alignment—Organizations were finding it more and more difficult to keep those increasingly expensive IT systems aligned with business need.

The bottom line: more cost, less value. These problems, first recognized 20 years ago, have today reached a crisis point. The cost and complexity of IT systems have exponentially increased, while the chances of deriving real value from those systems have dramatically decreased.

Today’s bottom line: even more cost, even less value. Large organizations can no longer afford to ignore these problems. The field of enterprise architecture that 20 years ago seemed quaintly quixotic today seems powerfully prophetic.

Many enterprise-architectural methodologies have come and gone in the last 20 years. At this point, perhaps 90 percent of the field use one of these four methodologies:

  • The Zachman Framework for Enterprise Architectures—Although self-described as a framework, is actually more accurately defined as a taxonomy
  • The Open Group Architectural Framework (TOGAF)—Although called a framework, is actually more accurately defined as a process
  • The Federal Enterprise Architecture—Can be viewed as either an implemented enterprise architecture or a proscriptive methodology for creating an enterprise architecture
  • The Gartner Methodology—Can be best described as an enterprise architectural practice

Finding the Value in SOA

Confronted with the age old problems of agility and complexity, today’s CIOs are under more pressure than ever to improve the strategic value of IT to the business. At best, these challenges have increased costs, limited innovation and increased risk. At worst, they have reduced IT’s ability to respond to changing business needs in a timely fashion.

Yet, changes for business and IT are continuing to occur at an ever-increasing pace. To keep up, enterprises need to adopt an agile, flexible architecture style with a proven strategic approach to delivering IT to the business.

What is TOGAF?

Yes, TOGAF is an EA (Enterprise Architecture) framework – but what is that suppose to mean?

Imagine that you have to oversee the IT integration of 2 companies which has merged and they have different ERP, CRM, billing system and the customer facing process are different. The merged entity needs to rationalize the product offering and needs to project a uniform and integrated face to the customer. Obviously, this is going to be a big challenge – technological, people, process and change-management. How would you go about this complex transition? You can do a ground up thinking and make a plan or you can take the help on an EA framework like TOGAF and tailor it to your specific needs.